Monthly Archives: April 2011

Pesky possessives

That day for mothers is fast approaching, and with it comes a possessive apostrophe question. Should you wish your mother: Happy Mothers Day, Happy Mother’s Day, or Happy Mothers’ Day? The widespread consensus appears to be for Mother’s Day. That’s what you’ll find on cards, in ads, and on most of the signage in shops. […]

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Those way wood sheep

Sometimes I come across a writing error that makes me laugh out loud. Last week I was reading a magazine article, and encountered this sentence … ‘On January 1, 2009, I shuffled along a country road, keeping an eye out for the usual hazards – farm dogs, way wood sheep.’ I wonder whether those wayward, self-willed, […]

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Seeing (but not reading) red

Churches and schools around Brisbane often use display signs to announce upcoming events or communicate words of wisdom. Most remain outside the digital age, and  have a manual sign like the one shown above. They all seem to have a set of black and red letters, and the signs usually incorporate a combination of black and red words within […]

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Learning about document structure

Last week, Radio National’s Life Matters program featured an interview with Cyril Peupion, author of ‘Work Smarter: Live Better’. Cyril was talking about people’s inefficiencies at work – particularly with tasks like email. Cyril noted that most people start their working lives with little idea about how to work efficiently. It’s not something that’s taught […]

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Communicating through distraction

This morning I attended a fascinating breakfast seminar about distraction. It was called ‘Neuroscience of Distraction: Managing Distraction and Maintaining Focus’, and was presented by Geoff Grahl from Australian Aeorspace. The organiser was NeuroLeadership Solutions. Geoff made several comments about distraction that resonated strongly for me. For example: The more information we receive, the more likely we […]

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